“Beyond doubt, the most salient characteristic of life in this latter portion of the nineteenth century is SPEED – what we may call hurry, the rate at which we move, the high-pressure at which we work;- and the question to be considered is, first, whether this rapid rate is in itself a good; and, next, whether it is worth the price we pay for it.”

– W.R. Greg, Life at High Pressure (1877)

Also see, The cult of busy.

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One Response to “Quote of the week”

  1. Sean Crawford |

    When to be speedy is best chosen by thought, not habit.

    For example i could think of whether I am at work, needing my executive stride, or in the city enjoying my leisure time.

    In my just posted (on Monday) essay “Rushing and Reading” I spoke of an old couple who would savour their last bite of crumpet but be out the door at the precise second they said they would. They chose to be efficient without any sense of rushing or panic.

    I can’t imagine them driving unlawfully or passing people on an escalator, For me, if I think it through, saving a mere few seconds is not worth wasting an expensive escalator, nor worth omitting grace from my life.

    Reply

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