Some of you know, in addition to my writing and speaking work, I work as a team lead for WordPress.com, managing a team of developers and designers.  It’s an amazing place to work, and I’ve given a few talks about how we make design and engineering decisions.

You can read a popular post I wrote called How WordPress.com is made, which focuses on how our 100 person company works, even though we are distributed around the globe, all the time. You can also read Automattic CEO Toni Schnieder’s post In praise of Continuous Deployment, about how we deploy new features and code.

I gave a short lecture on how wp.com is made at WordCamp Seattle (an informal series of events  around the world for people interested in WordPress) which you can watch below. When I gave this talk again in Portugal, someone from Corefactor made a sketchnote, documenting the core points I made.

Here’s the talk from Wordcamp Seattle:

If you get bored, skip to 18:30, where i talk about how we almost never use email. I talk about Jetpack at 23:00, and Q&A begins at about 31:00. If you have trouble with the embedded version, go here.

  • This site is powered with the magic of space age email to send my best posts to you each month. No hassle, no spam, no fuss. (privacy policy enforced by my Rotweiller)

You Will Like These:

5 Responses to “How WordPress.com is made”

  1. Ora Baumgarten |

    We have created an open, non-profit calendar blog called ONE CHANGE A DAY
    http://moocblogcalendar.wordpress.com/
    which will feature 365 blog posts from around education and mooc worlds As thousands of people are choosing to learn through massive open online courses in and around the web, this blog will tell a story of how new ways of connecting with each other online are irreversibly changing education. It will also be published as a shared artifact of everyone’s experiences in print and digital calendar format at the end of the year.

    We would love to include your post
    with your kind permission. The calendar blog is using the http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ licence. Would this cause any conflicts with your current publishing permissions?
    Thank you so much in advance, Ora Baumgarten

    Reply
  2. Nicola Avery |

    Hi Scott, would it be possible to include your post in One Change A Day blog that we have started to create which will feature posts during 2012 relating to education and change?

    Reply
  1. [...] How WordPress.com is made (scottberkun.com) Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInDiggMásCorreo electrónicoTumblrStumbleUponRedditMe gusta:Me gustaSé el primero en decir que te gusta esta post. Tags: temas de WordPress Permalink [...]

Leave a Reply